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Charts Graphs & Other Useful Diagrams


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#26 4evergreen

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 07:30 AM

I just found this chart which I think is very useful at www.weedfarmer.com

Use this chart to help you determine the possible causes for whatever strange problem you seem to be having. Don't forget that your problem may not necessarily be a lack of any particular nutrient, the issue is often availability. High pH can prevent plants from absorbing vital nutrients. Extreme humidity may cause leaves to remain tissue paper thin. Take small steps in your attempts to balance your nutrient solution. It is better to under-feed your plants than to overdose them. Try adding about half of a recommended concentration as you experiment. You can always add more later

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#27 jangel

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 08:46 AM

VERY good chart. Thank you for adding to our wisdom. Peace
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#28 kailiwela44

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 10:08 PM

I posted this thread a while back for me to refer to. There are a couple charts and some real time calculation windows. I don't know how to do all the techy stuffs but hope this helps.

http://www.greenpass...-searchin-7759/

Random info to limit random searchin
"What temp in grow space and how much ventilation"

Marijuana Growing Forums - What temperature will my growspace get and how much ventilation will I need?

"Ventilation Calculator" in Metric not emperial

Tools - Marijuana Growing Forums

"Metric to imperial"

Marijuana Growing Forums - Metric to English conversion chart

C to F temperature conversion

Fahrenheit to Celsius Converter

anything else to add? I'm posting this because i can never remember where to find the info direct.
__________________
Hempy hybrid (pau)


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#29 jangel

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 01:11 PM

Photosynthetic activity range

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#30 jangel

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Posted 29 April 2009 - 01:17 PM

Converting Watts Amps Voltage

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#31 Guest_jeffsyrov_*

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 05:28 AM

A few more random ones on sexing and gender


Its very nice. Thanks for sharing jangel

#32 justanotherbozo

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 10:12 AM

here are a couple of charts i came across in my travels through the forums
that are really handy to have.

these are working charts for you, the grower to use for keeping your notes.

in the interests of fairness, i collected them from a user over at can.com
named MVP.

anyway, they really are helpful.

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#33 Tokecrazy

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 11:44 AM

Here's a link that I use alot,well all the time when I need to know what ever .
WWW.ASKNUMBERS.COM. It's got it all,take a look for youself.Peace
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#34 jangel

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Posted 09 June 2009 - 04:15 PM

Here is another one, folks. Shows the proper names for part of the plant and differences in sex.

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#35 pine boy

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 09:18 AM

Here is a cool thing of interest.Hope someone finds it usefulglowstar.gif
This is not my work .I got it from somewhere else:homer:
:rolleyes:



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Here is another diagram that you should look at:

Posted Image

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#36 pine boy

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 08:05 AM

Heres a graph that might help with lockout issues...shrugsmiley.gif

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#37 raf33

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Posted 14 July 2009 - 08:58 AM

Thx a lot Pine,fantastic stuff,really,explained a lot to me.cheers. just wanted to add Biobizz feeding schedule,I refer to it many times and find it very useful and interesting so I wanted to share.

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#38 Hatch

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Posted 10 July 2009 - 01:57 AM

Here Is Some Good Stuff.

The Nature of Light | Back to Top

White light is separated into the different colors (=wavelengths) of light by passing it through a prism. Wavelength is defined as the distance from peak to peak (or trough to trough). The energy of is inversely porportional to the wavelength: longer wavelengths have less energy than do shorter ones.
Posted Image Wavelength and other saspects of the wave nature of light. Image from Purves et al., Life: The Science of Biology, 4th Edition, by Sinauer Associates (www.sinauer.com) and WH Freeman (www.whfreeman.com), used with permission.
The order of colors is determined by the wavelength of light. Visible light is one small part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The longer the wavelength of visible light, the more red the color. Likewise the shorter wavelengths are towards the violet side of the spectrum. Wavelengths longer than red are referred to as infrared, while those shorter than violet are ultraviolet.
Posted Image The electromagnetic spectrum. Image from Purves et al., Life: The Science of Biology, 4th Edition, by Sinauer Associates (www.sinauer.com) and WH Freeman (www.whfreeman.com), used with permission.
Light behaves both as a wave and a particle. Wave properties of light include the bending of the wave path when passing from one material (medium) into another (i.e. the prism, rainbows, pencil in a glass-of-water, etc.). The particle properties are demonstrated by the photoelectric effect. Zinc exposed to ultraviolet light becomes positively charged because light energy forces electrons from the zinc. These electrons can create an electrical current. Sodium, potassium and selenium have critical wavelengths in the visible light range. The critical wavelength is the maximum wavelength of light (visible or invisible) that creates a photoelectric effect.
Chlorophyll and Accessory Pigments | Back to Top

A pigment is any substance that absorbs light. The color of the pigment comes from the wavelengths of light reflected (in other words, those not absorbed). Chlorophyll, the green pigment common to all photosynthetic cells, absorbs all wavelengths of visible light except green, which it reflects to be detected by our eyes. Black pigments absorb all of the wavelengths that strike them. White pigments/lighter colors reflect all or almost all of the energy striking them. Pigments have their own characteristic absorption spectra, the absorption pattern of a given pigment.
Posted Image Absorption and transmission of different wavelengths of light by a hypothetical pigment. Image from Purves et al., Life: The Science of Biology, 4th Edition, by Sinauer Associates (www.sinauer.com) and WH Freeman (www.whfreeman.com), used with permission.
Chlorophyll is a complex molecule. Several modifications of chlorophyll occur among plants and other photosynthetic organisms. All photosynthetic organisms (plants, certain protistans, prochlorobacteria, and cyanobacteria) have chlorophyll a. Accessory pigments absorb energy that chlorophyll a does not absorb. Accessory pigments include chlorophyll b (also c, d, and e in algae and protistans), xanthophylls, and carotenoids (such as beta-carotene). Chlorophyll a absorbs its energy from the Violet-Blue and Reddish orange-Red wavelengths, and little from the intermediate (Green-Yellow-Orange) wavelengths.
Posted Image Molecular model of chlorophyll. The above image is from http://www.nyu.edu:8...l/library/photo.
Posted Image Molecular model of carotene. The above image is from http://www.nyu.edu:8...l/library/photo.
Carotenoids and chlorophyll b absorb some of the energy in the green wavelength. Why not so much in the orange and yellow wavelengths? Both chlorophylls also absorb in the orange-red end of the spectrum (with longer wavelengths and lower energy). The origins of photosynthetic organisms in the sea may account for this. Shorter wavelengths (with more energy) do not penetrate much below 5 meters deep in sea water. The ability to absorb some energy from the longer (hence more penetrating) wavelengths might have been an advantage to early photosynthetic algae that were not able to be in the upper (photic) zone of the sea all the time.
Posted Image The molecular structure of chlorophylls. Image from Purves et al., Life: The Science of Biology, 4th Edition, by Sinauer Associates (www.sinauer.com) and WH Freeman (www.whfreeman.com), used with permission.
The action spectrum of photosynthesis is the relative effectiveness of different wavelengths of light at generating electrons. If a pigment absorbs light energy, one of three things will occur. Energy is dissipated as heat. The energy may be emitted immediately as a longer wavelength, a phenomenon known as fluorescence. Energy may trigger a chemical reaction, as in photosynthesis. Chlorophyll only triggers a chemical reaction when it is associated with proteins embedded in a membrane (as in a chloroplast) or the membrane infoldings found in photosynthetic prokaryotes such as cyanobacteria and prochlorobacteria.
Posted ImagePosted Image Absorption spectrum of several plant pigments (left) and action spectrum of elodea (right), a common aquarium plant used in lab experiments about photosynthesis. Images from Purves et al., Life: The Science of Biology, 4th Edition, by Sinauer Associates (www.sinauer.com) and WH Freeman (www.whfreeman.com), used with permission.
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#39 Lumix

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Posted 26 April 2009 - 01:07 AM

Here's another contribution to LST
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#40 Guest_unrefined.hybrid_*

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 08:26 AM

Hey all, just a little something I think may help someone.

I'm putting it in organics as that's sometimes the most confusing field in terms of working out what is going on with your plants. Please move it (and slap me) if it should be somewhere else!

This is Mulder's Chart, aka the Stimulation-Antagonism Chart.

http://www.apal.com....ONS July 08.pdf

It shows how levels of one available mineral nutrient impacts on the availability (or otherwise) of another.

It looks a little hairbrained at first, but makes sense fast enough when used in conjunction with the more commonly found "pH and Nutrient Availability" charts I'm sure everyone has seen before. Taught me a lot when I was studying.

Mulder's Chart is very handy to have around for those puzzling symptoms and for diagnosing multiple deficiencies brought about by overfeeding or local soil deficiency.

Remember that it depicts how the presence of increased levels of one nutrient causes less or more of another nutrient to be available to the plant.

To use for "working backwards" to determine which set of combined deficiency symptoms is actually the result of a deficiency of ONE nutrient, first work out which set of combination deficiencies is present, then see what other nute they all have in common, then think of "pushing your finger down" on the point of that nutrient .... it will "drag down" the availability of those it stimulates.

And it'd make a very confusing t-shirt design as well!

#41 pine boy

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 08:52 AM

Heres a graph on light intensity:pot leaf: :D: :D:



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#42 Lumix

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 09:49 AM

How much is your average?


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#43 sabasi

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 02:48 PM

I am going to try this for this grow. It apparently is pretty accurate.


Did you try it?? And? I found 6"male looking" seeds and 5 "female looking" seeds. I'm gonna germ the ones I think are female and see if I'm right :) Is that how the seed banks sort their seeds then for the feminised line?:)
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#44 Lumix

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 06:14 PM

More charts :Greetings from GP:

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#45 jangel

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 06:15 PM

No that is not how seeds are sorted at seedbanks. Try it but I don't know if I just can't see that well or not but I found it did not help much. I had several that I thought male seeds be girls and a few males, but not necessarily what I said would be by the chart. it works for some people. Peace
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#46 sabasi

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Posted 22 August 2009 - 07:17 PM

No that is not how seeds are sorted at seedbanks.

Try it but I don't know if I just can't see that well or not but I found it did not help much. I had several that I thought male seeds be girls and a few males, but not necessarily what I said would be by the chart. it works for some people.

Peace


Silly me! I'm forgetting how little space I have for all these experiments! I was trying for a perpetual micro grow...take 4 plants down a week and put 4 clones in from veg. And under cfl's at that lol At least my first clone ever is still alive on the 3rd day!:Greetings from GP: Yay!!
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#47 Guest_Doobiedude_*

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 08:24 AM

More charts nailbiting.gif


Like your seed planting chart but I can't read it... can you be a little more clear with the bottom part? Are you saying you prefer to plant with the taproot up?

#48 Lumix

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 09:18 AM

Like your seed planting chart but I can't read it... can you be a little more clear with the bottom part? Are you saying you prefer to plant with the taproot up?



Here's a discussion on tap root position
http://www.greenpass...itioning-11938/
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#49 jangel

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Posted 24 August 2009 - 10:07 AM

No it is tap root down.
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#50 sabasi

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Posted 25 August 2009 - 04:30 PM

No it is tap root down.


I can confirm this works! 5/5 so far!!
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