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Spider Mites!!


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#51 Guest_bud_boy_*

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 07:37 AM

using it systemically seems to be working!!! It's only been a couple of days, but some are dead, and the ones that are alive have a very soft ectoskeleton. I'm in late flower, so I'm done with spraying. My experience with these f*cking borgs has been that they live through everything and get stronger. Humidity does NOT kill them and if you are in late flower, you will rot your buds!


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#52 justanotherbozo

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 07:53 AM

eliminating mites is much harder than preventing them.

personally, i've had really good luck with nothing more than HotShot NoPest
strips but i am a micro-grower so my environment is small.

anyway, here is some info i found on the web which might be of some use.

i hope this helps!



How to Get Rid of Spider Mites

Getting rid of spider mites (often incorrectly spelled spidermites) from your garden is priority number one if you’re recognized a spider mite infestation because in the world of horticulture there are mites and then there are spider mites, or what we can call the two-spotted mite. Spider mite populations grow so quickly that often times a farmer or gardener is caught off guard. Warm, dry temperatures make the perfect climate for the spider mite’s reproductive cycle, which leaves your plants susceptible not only to drought but also to the spider mite’s tenacious appetite. If you’ve noticed the signs of a mite infestation described on your left, and you’re dealing primarily with flowers, it may be in your best interest to turn to a miticide for the quickest and most effective control. However, if you’re a farmer or a gardener tending vegetables and herbs, you may want to consider an integrated pest management approach, which is what we’ll explain below: how to get rid of spider mites and control spider mite populations without insecticides or miticides, as the case may be.

Posted Image Natural Spider Mite Control

Posted Image
Horticultural Oils such as that extracted from the neem tree, are excellent alternatives to non-organic compounds when you want to kill spider mites. One must be wary, however, of the ingredients used to produce the horticultural oil purchased because historically horticultural oils have been derived from petroleum rather than vegetable oils. But change is coming.
Horticultural oils used to kill spider mites should be applied during the day during warmer periods to ensure quicker evaporation, thus reducing the chances of damaging the plants. Plants that are noticeably under water stress should not be sprayed with oils.
Posted Image
Insecticidal soaps are rather mean way to kill mites. Derived from organic soaps like Castile soap, insecticidal soaps kill mites and other plant pests by compromising their cellular integrity, causing cells to rupture and die. In other words, insecticidal soaps dissolve the spider mite from the inside out, slowly turning them into mush. The usual recipe is about 2-3 drops of castile soap for every quart of water. There are premixed commercial applications available online if you don’t feel you have the experience necessary to mix your own insecticidal soaps.
Getting rid of spider mites (often incorrectly spelled spidermites) from your garden is priority number one if you’re recognized a spider mite infestation because in the world of horticulture there are mites and then there are spider mites, or what we can call the two-spotted mite. Spider mite populations grow so quickly that often times a farmer or gardener is caught off guard. Warm, dry temperatures make the perfect climate for the spider mite’s reproductive cycle, which leaves your plants susceptible not only to drought but also to the spider mite’s tenacious appetite. If you’ve noticed the signs of a mite infestation described on your left, and you’re dealing primarily with flowers, it may be in your best interest to turn to a miticide for the quickest and most effective control. However, if you’re a farmer or a gardener tending vegetables and herbs, you may want to consider an integrated pest management approach, which is what we’ll explain below: how to get rid of spider mites and control spider mite populations without insecticides or miticides, as the case may be.
Spider Mite Control

Questions or suggestions? Check out our Gardening Forum.

The first step toward getting rid of spider mites is to isolate the plants, but keep the infested plants clustered. Isolating your plants will reduce the risk of spider mite migration. Spider mites are quite adept at riding air currents to and from the plants they wish to feed on. Keeping your plants in clusters will help retain moisture by reducing airflow between the plants. Spider mites are not very keen on moist climates; they need the evaporative properties of an arid climate to reproduce more efficiently.
Posted Image Retaining humidity and moisture is a good way to get rid of spider mites. This can be accomplished in several ways. If you’re tending potted plants, keeping your pots over a platter of water will help keep immediate moisture levels up. If you’re tending to garden plants, you may want to consider putting in peat moss to fill the gaps between plants. Of course, the best way to keep humidity and moisture levels high is to bring your plants indoors where they can be misted with very cold water on a regular basis (2-3 times a day). The same treatment can be done to outdoor plants with firm but careful sprayings to help drown the mites and remove them from the plants. Posted Image Keeping plants out of the late afternoon sun and/or arid weather is perhaps your best defense against spider mites. This may not be possible for those of us who cannot remove plants via pots, but any way to provide shade to damaged or weakened plants during the warmer hours of the day will help. For indoor plants, drawing the shades or moving plants out of direct sunlight should help dissuade spider mites from taking up permanent residency. You may also want to consider setting a humidifier next to any affected plants. Posted Image It has been suggested that spraying plants with a 1:1 mixture of alcohol and water will kill spider mites on contact. Rubbing alcohol, like any alcohol for any creature, is poisonous in high dosages, and it evaporates quickly doing little damage to the plant it’s been sprayed on. Some people suggest a 1:3 mixture of rubbing alcohol to water, but the strong the mixture, the more certain you are to get as many mites as possible. Make sure to cover the entire plant, focusing on the bottoms of the leaves where spider mites tend to hang out. Posted Image If all else fails, miticides are, of course, one of the most effective forms of spider mite treatments and the fastest way to get rid of spider mites—usually. It all depends on the kind of miticide that you choose. Some of the most common miticides are Avid, Kelthane, and just about anything that contains pyrethoids. These chemicals should be applied once every five days until all signs of spider mite infestation have gone. Again, people gardening vegetables and herbs should try every other avenue before using miticides, including the biological mite controls described below. Posted Image

Questions or suggestions? Check out our Gardening Forum.

Biological Mite Control

Predatory mites are, in many new age gardener’s opinions, the best way to control spider mites. Predatory mites are mites that do not feed on plants but on other mites, like the two-spotted mite, for instance. Predatory mites can usually be mail-ordered from a horticultural warehouse or purchased online from any number of online gardening vendors. For the sake of brevity, we will cover just three of the most common predatory mites used to kill and control spider mites:

Phytoseiulus persimilis is referred to by the Cornell University Extension office as “ one of the mainstays of greenhouse integrated pest management.” The great thing about this species of mite is that it cleans up after itself once the spider mite population is gone—cannibalizing on each other, thus decimating their own populations.

Metaseiulus occidentalis is another common predatory mite used to kill spider mites. It is an effective biological control only if temperatures are on average between 44 degrees and 89 degrees Fahrenheit.

Phytoseiulus longpipes is essentially a variant of the Phytoseiulus persimilis mite brought in from Africa which can stand warmer ambient temperatures than its North American cousins. Longpipes is seeing a gain in popularity among gardeners who would rather deploy a biological spider mite control agent than a chemical or physical control.


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#53 medicinecloset

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Posted 22 June 2009 - 10:48 AM

using it systemically seems to be working!!!
It's only been a couple of days, but some are dead, and the ones that are alive have a very soft ectoskeleton.

I'm in late flower, so I'm done with spraying. My experience with these f*cking borgs has been that they live through everything and get stronger. Humidity does NOT kill them and if you are in late flower, you will rot your buds!

Heya bud,
Okay Higher Humidity will not kill them all if they have established colonies you are right BUT it is a FACT that if you catch them in the development stages Humidity above 60% will implode them. I am in the 11th week of flowering and unfortunately my humidity is around 60-65% but with cooler air circulation constantly moving around the plants you are not going to rot buds. If that were always the case I would have rotten buds on this plant by now and there aint a one rot sign on it. It can be done my friend. I have to say though like before, once they colonize to any numbers(which they always do) you'd do better by wiping out the grow and thoroughly cleaning your grow area and maintaining a proper Climate(ventilation) Huh I am one to talk as I have no exhaust other than a fan exhausting out the window outside.LOL I am just trying to use MY personal experience to help ya get it under control but others probably have better methods. Your right about not foliar spraying during flowering though my friend. Iuse alot of HID light though so I never do because of the "clarifying" damage that can occur. I found that out the hard way real quick.
Good Luck and Peace,
Med

#54 Guest_bud_boy_*

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Posted 24 June 2009 - 04:30 PM

2nd follow-up on Azatrol systematic usage: Same situation, there are mites, but they are not doing well!! The ectoskeleton is like butter. Azatrol screws with the reproductive abilities of the mites, so eggs are not being laid. The ones that are hatching are maturing into retards. There are zero fungus gnats. I can't swear that there won't be a few mutants that survive this, but I recommend using this stuff sytemically when you can't spray. It doesn't really have an odor, it's organic and I flush anyway, so, it should be fine.

Edited by bud_boy, 24 June 2009 - 04:31 PM.
typo


#55 Guest_bud_boy_*

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 05:42 AM

just saw info about this new miticide + ovicide called
SucraShield
It's organic and made from sucrose and food grade fatty acids.
Sounds promising!

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 09:56 PM

thats cool that the Phytoseiulus persimilis predator mite cannibalize each other after the spider mites are gone. any way i have had a gnat problem for a couple of weeks now. first off, is there more than one kind of gnat? secondly what is the best way to kill them? i've just been smashing everyone i can get my hands on which is getting old quick.

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 10:03 PM

I hate mites... those little buggers just forced me into an early harvest. Dr doom didn't work for me, killed some but not all.

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Posted 13 October 2009 - 10:05 PM

I had gnats too... controlled them with a product called gonats (sp?) You apply to roots and as a foliage spray. It didn't totally get rid of them but after a couple applications they were under control enough so my ladies could keep growing.

#59 gramma watt

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Posted 14 October 2009 - 03:45 PM

Our last grow was rather large, and we ended up with a mite infestation.
I tried everything you guys have` talked about in this thread with no luck. Neem was ooey gooey stuff that suffocated my plants. I tried everything, and nothing worked but Floramite. 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon per gallon..spray on and mites die..period and it gets them all the first time.
Problem is it's very expensive, but i got a small bottle on Ebay.
1oz BTL FLORAMITE SC *FREE* SHIPPING 3-5 DAYS - eBay (item 260476791119 end time Nov-12-09 15:15:07 PST)

It is for ornamental use, and non fruit bearing trees, but you can use it 3 weeks before harvest.
lost earlier entire crops to mites..living out in the country and going out with the dogs on hikes, etc...bringing them in on our bodies. When we moved in to our new place..there were mites all over the weeds and plants next to the porch, and they were crawling all over the porch rails.
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#60 Desert Woman

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 10:41 PM

We call it that because some clown at another forum came up with the formula and it saved many a garden! mix 50/50 70% alcohol and water in a sprayer spray the crap out of your plants on a regular basis repeat as needed got my sprayer all ready to go got the lights off and cooling puttin on the BTVS music videos to get pumped... GAAAAsmiley.gif those mites are in for a fight!
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#61 DieAbetic

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 10:52 PM

I have a product called Azatrol and was just looking at the application info and noticed there is a root application. It's main ingredient is the same as neem, but yet they claim there is no neem in the product. It, like neem it is organic.
I'm giving it a try since I am in late flower and don't want to keep spraying.
I will post my results here.

My experience with mites is that they are extemely resilient. The ones I have are immune to pyrethrin foggers. The last time I set off a doctor doom, following all directions, sealing the room, turning the fans off, etc. not one mite died.
I have success with 50/50 rubbing alcohol and water mixture (this evaporates quickly, so it doesn't harm the plants at all providing you turn the lights off) and a mixture of neem, cedar oil and cinnimite. I have also read that there is an australian product called eco oil which is canola oil, with teatree and eucalyptus. SM90, though great for powdery mildew does absolutely nothing for these mites. People who keep posting that it works must be dealing with a wimpy breed of mite!


I guess mine must be weak because thats what i use and its great. I love my bottle of SM-90 with all my heart lol. in the past i have used the Hot Shotz Strips, but learned they have a neurotoxin, and since my grow was within the house, stopped using them. but if i had a grow outside or away from living areas.....i would ONLY use those things....they are amazing.
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#62 Guest_alldayeducation_*

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Posted 19 October 2009 - 12:32 AM

I had a bad case of spider mites, and some1 here suggested to me to mix chilli power and garlic in water with a tad of dish soap.. spray them with that soultion every 3 days and one day after , so on forth day with water .....2 weeks later there all gone ty so much whoever told me to do that works great.

#63 Michael

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 05:31 AM

This is what I got, yesterday, to deal with by recently detected borg infestation:

http://www.genhydro...._ghss/am_ss.pdf

It looks like a winner.

#64 Guest_bud_boy_*

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 05:35 AM

Spider mites suck -- here's some info I recently found re floramite:

FloraMite is in the least toxic group of pesticides which also have the signal word CAUTION on the label, but is listed as toxic and classified as Category IV pesticides. These pesticides require amounts greater than a pint for a liquid or greater than 350 grams for a solid to cause death in a 150 lb man. Pesticides in this group include: Benomyl, Copper Sulfate solutions, Diatomaceous Earth, Sulfur WP, Neem Oil and Safer Soap.

Floramite is classified right along side Neem oil , Safer Soap & diatmaceous earth etc and none of these (even neem oil) should be considered nontoxic. That means that even though any pesticide has only a small likelihood of being harmful, caution should always be used when handling these chemicals, particularly in concentrated form.

Avid is in the category III rating which one should use with caution . When u get into category I & II these are the ones that must be used with extreme care but would rarely ever be used on MJ .

#65 gramma watt

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 09:47 AM

Spider mites suck -- here's some info I recently found re floramite:

FloraMite is in the least toxic group of pesticides which also have the signal word CAUTION on the label, but is listed as toxic and classified as Category IV pesticides. These pesticides require amounts greater than a pint for a liquid or greater than 350 grams for a solid to cause death in a 150 lb man. Pesticides in this group include: Benomyl, Copper Sulfate solutions, Diatomaceous Earth, Sulfur WP, Neem Oil and Safer Soap.

Floramite is classified right along side Neem oil , Safer Soap & diatmaceous earth etc and none of these (even neem oil) should be considered nontoxic. That means that even though any pesticide has only a small likelihood of being harmful, caution should always be used when handling these chemicals, particularly in concentrated form.

Avid is in the category III rating which one should use with caution . When u get into category I & II these are the ones that must be used with extreme care but would rarely ever be used on MJ .


TY bud_boy
Believe me when I say I have tried EVERYTHING else. Wasted about $100 bucks before I bought some floramite.
One treatment on an infested crop and they were GONE.
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#66 Desert Woman

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 12:51 PM

OK, in my Grow Journal BTDT suggested I check for spider mites...and yep, the little bastages are there...:)

OK, I called all the local nurseries and they all don't carry that other little bug that kills them, so I'm left with wipes and sprays. One suggested something called "Mite-X", a solution made from clove oil.

Anyone ahve any luck with these wipe down products? Any suggestions on alternatives?

HELP! I need to deal with this today, as I won't be in town (30 miles away) again for days..

ISO


anyone ever try these little guys?

Spider Mite Predators

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#67 Desert Woman

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 12:53 PM

This is what I got, yesterday, to deal with by recently detected borg infestation:

http://www.genhydro...._ghss/am_ss.pdf

It looks like a winner.


did it get rid of em?
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#68 Guest_bud_boy_*

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Posted 07 December 2009 - 07:30 PM

Desert Woman, azamat and azatrol are the same chemical derived from neem.
There's another new product called Sucra Shield, extracted from
tobacco leaf sugars so it's organic. It kills eggs too, it's way less
expensive than all the other products.

#69 Desert Woman

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 12:55 AM

Desert Woman, azamat and azatrol are the same chemical derived from neem.
There's another new product called Sucra Shield, extracted from
tobacco leaf sugars so it's organic. It kills eggs too, it's way less
expensive than all the other products.


killing eggs is essential. she lays hundreds a day.

jumping.gifhelpgif


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#70 akairan

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Posted 18 April 2010 - 02:07 PM

just saw info about this new miticide + ovicide called
SucraShield
It's organic and made from sucrose and food grade fatty acids.
Sounds promising!

Just tried Sucrashield last night. Will check on Tuesday the results. Talked to a guy who said that Sucrashield was gentle to the plants, but that Sucrashield dissolved the mites skin and they dry up. Does the same to the eggs. But it is a contact spray so it has to touch the critters to do them in. Also have used Azamax. Awesome results, but you should wait 14 days before you respray, so I tried this. Lost entire first crop to the creepy critters and won't let that happen again.
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#71 strider

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 08:07 AM

The "neurotoxin" in the Hot Shot strips is the exact same chemical that is used in pet flea collars (dichlorvos). In much lower concentrations. I have a strip in each of my spaces and only have to deal with mites when the damn cat brings in hitch hikers. The strips are the only pest control I have used since '06. I never spray anything on my girls!

Edited by strider, 19 April 2010 - 08:43 AM.

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#72 Guest_drgreenthumbs_*

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 09:10 AM

hey u should try lady bugs they work very well let 1 or 2 roam around ur garden they will eat the shit outa them mites an there unborn....when ur fin with them u can catch them an keep them in ur fridge till u need them again..

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Posted 19 April 2010 - 07:42 PM

Knock on wood, have yet to have major issues with mites and/or other pests. But, when they would come around would look at the conditions of the grow room. It would be usually be around the times less care was taken in keepin it clean. Whenever i hear someone say that you just have to live with it, it kinda makes me upset...what would you say if a person caught the clap and the doc just said "you just have to live with it." When all it takes is maybe an extra minute to sweep up. I have disinfecting wipes that I wipe my floor down with, not a big room but crawling between plants is a pain ( wife says I should really invest in a swiffer, lol). However, when those little SOB's appear we have some neem on hand and use at a 2tbsp per gallon and give them a spray, do this every 5 days for about 3-5 wks. Then take everything out of the room wash walls and floors with 10% bleach solution and then preceed to spray everywhere with safers soap...let dry and put all plants back...pain in the ass. So, all in all, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure....all puns intended:)

Edited by svaldezcdxx, 19 April 2010 - 07:53 PM.


#74 Guest_tech#53_*

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 01:55 AM

SM-90 Does it work as well as you say? I have a healthy grow going into 3rd week of flower and just found a crap-load of these lil'devils. hmm. Lady bugs SM-90 Floramite Sc Azamax Which to use?

Edited by tech#53, 25 April 2010 - 02:20 AM.


#75 akairan

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Posted 25 April 2010 - 02:27 AM

Have checked every plant, and every leaf with a 30X magnifying glass. No bugs to be found. But I am on a two week schedule. They seem to come out of thin air. I had to destroy my entire first crop 3 weeks before harvest because I didn't check for about 5 days and the population exploded. I have three potions I use, Sucrashield, Mite-Rid, and Azamax. I don't want the mites to become resistant to any one product. I have heard that females lay about 100 eggs a day and 70% of the 100 are females. Good luck.
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