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hot weather and lots of water


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#1 Mogie

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Posted 02 August 2007 - 03:29 AM

Almost hit 100 today and must of hauled almost 25 gallons of water. The girls are still slightly wilted. Going to try to give them some shade tomarrow. But considering these girls are about 5 feet tall and weigh a good 20 lbs. each lugging them around is out of the question. But what about shade cloth? Or us there a cheaper alternative anyone knows of?


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#2 hempie

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Posted 02 August 2007 - 03:33 AM

do you have a tarp and a few poles laying around anywhere? or use trash bags and string them over.

#3 green_nobody

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Posted 02 August 2007 - 05:34 PM

i would look into camo nets mogie, they are lightweight, cheap, hide our grow and give shade. for that i still use them on scuba trips to the surrounding lake here. check you surplus stores around or make on yourself, that isn't difficult at all.

#4 green_nobody

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Posted 02 August 2007 - 05:36 PM

and for the water problem, use a wheelbarrow and put a barrel on top. or get a 12v camping pump with filter and some cheap garden hose. 40 bucks well invested mogie;)

#5 Mogie

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Posted 03 August 2007 - 02:22 AM

Thanks green two good ideas thanks.

#6 Guest_GeckoPunk_*

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 08:56 PM

Maybe, just maybe, you'd consider using water-retention crystals mixed with your soil medium next grow... I do believe that would aid your ladies in a refreshing supply of the water they will need with such a torrid climate you have... Just food for thought... :I am sorry:/> Beat the heat brother... :boxing:

#7 Giggles

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 08:58 PM

Maybe, just maybe, you'd consider using water-retention crystals mixed with your soil medium next grow... I do believe that would aid your ladies in a refreshing supply of the water they will need with such a torrid climate you have...

Just food for thought... :I am sorry:/>
Beat the heat brother... :boxing:


Never thought of that, have you tried this? sounds like a good idea.

#8 Guest_GeckoPunk_*

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 09:14 PM

Yeah, it works wonders... There's just one problem, after reading a previous post of hers, I realized that she probably does already use the crystals... I also use the good ol' Sphaggy Moss and Mulch on the top layer (yet still a couple inches under some top soil to help with the camo)... It's tough not to let it get too close and get in the way, but that's why we dig the big-fat holes! :I am sorry:/>

#9 green_nobody

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 05:31 AM

Maybe, just maybe, you'd consider using water-retention crystals mixed with your soil medium next grow... I do believe that would aid your ladies in a refreshing supply of the water they will need with such a torrid climate you have...

Just food for thought... :wink:/>
Beat the heat brother... :boxing:


i wouldn't use something crystalline that forms a gel later on as water storage, the risk that this will gel up the soil and either block or rot the roots is a bit too big in my view.
I would rather use perlite, especially the large grain size or even better expanded clay, also the large grain size would to be favored on the task. they keep the roots moist but still aired to prevent rot root cause by gel forming.

#10 Guest_GeckoPunk_*

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:29 PM

i wouldn't use something crystalline that forms a gel later on as water storage, the risk that this will gel up the soil and either block or rot the roots is a bit too big in my view.
I would rather use perlite, especially the large grain size or even better expanded clay, also the large grain size would to be favored on the task. they keep the roots moist but still aired to prevent rot root cause by gel forming.


It's not like I use a whole bag of the crystals per each whole... it's merely a small additive, just as I do also use perlite as well. Sometimes coir too, but to carry a small bag of crystals to a guerilla grow is a lot less suspicious than a backpack full of perlite and expanded clay...

I have yet to notice any root rot effects on my ladies though.

Thanks for the insight, I'll take that into consideration with how much I'll use with next Spring's guerilla grows, although luckily, this last spring, it seems as though I used a good amount considering I've yet to see her wilt... :)/>

#11 Giggles

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:37 PM

I know that FF Ocean Mix is made to help retain moisture.....

#12 Guest_GeckoPunk_*

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 11:33 PM

Yeah, we can thank the sphagnum peat moss God for that... :I am sorry:/> Earthworm castings, bat guano, and Pacific Northwest sea-going fish and crab meal. Composted forest humus, sandy loam, and sphagnum peat moss If i were a Canna-Plant, you'd bet I'd be thinking... "Damn this sounds delicious!" :love1:

#13 Guest_GeckoPunk_*

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 11:38 PM

I mean, come on... when the pH is adjusted at 6.3 to 6.8 to allow for optimum fertilizer uptake, you can bet that's always gonna be one heckuva product. You can always rest assured that their claims will always be on the money too... I've trusted many Fox Farm products... But then again I'm sidetracking. It's just good to know other people have really good taste in their soil mediums... :I am sorry:/> Great input.

#14 Giggles

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 11:58 PM

I mean, come on... when the pH is adjusted at 6.3 to 6.8 to allow for optimum fertilizer uptake, you can bet that's always gonna be one heckuva product. You can always rest assured that their claims will always be on the money too... I've trusted many Fox Farm products... But then again I'm sidetracking. It's just good to know other people have really good taste in their soil mediums... :I am sorry:/>

Great input.


My soil mixes contain Light Warrior, FF Planting soil, and Ocean Mix...sorry off topic

#15 Guest_HBB_*

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 04:00 PM

I would add alot of hardwood and softwood mulch. These are great for water retention, and for a nice place for the microlife to cling too. The camo net is a great idea. Also if you have hills, or large trees present (I know you said you don't want to) move the plant to the south side of the hill/tree so that the most intense sun will not affect your plants as much.

#16 green_nobody

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 07:53 AM

other way to retain water is as they do in Israel with their fields in the Negev desert, to place panda foil on top of the soil an leave only a hole for plant in to grow thru... works great there:wink:

#17 Mogie

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Posted 22 September 2007 - 04:22 PM

I just ended up lugging a lot of water. And it paid off my girls are lush green and very bushy. Watering outdoors, in a hot climate, with a soil mix that is heavy on vermiculite just = lots of water. It is worth it in the end. :Donut:

#18 green_nobody

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Posted 26 September 2007 - 02:50 PM

I just ended up lugging a lot of water. And it paid off my girls are lush green and very bushy. Watering outdoors, in a hot climate, with a soil mix that is heavy on vermiculite just = lots of water. It is worth it in the end. :Where Dreams are:


glad to hear that your operation is paying out for all the sweat you spend on em:)




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