Jump to content



                        Please Visit Our Paid Sponsors



Photo
- - - - -

Kiss The Girls!


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 HerbErb

HerbErb

    Hindsight is 2010.

  • Seasoned Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 122 posts

Posted 23 July 2010 - 09:15 PM

I help people that don't know how or that can't do much grow their own. My philosophy is simple: let the plant do its own thing. I've used several methods, and I don't diss any of them. I'm more of an 'agriculture' guy than a 'method' or 'strain' kinda guy. I think about marijuana's place in a garden or on a farm, with all the other plants, animals, insects and diseases you might find there. If you give the plant enough of what it needs and manage the state of the whole affair, I don't see how you can go wrong. That said, if you can't be a farmer, and you really need some herb, here is what I do to maximize yield while minimizing effort and waste: Use soil. No moving parts. The soil I use is plain ol' compost. Use organic stuff, with table scraps included. Compost is the stuff dirt is made of. The only amendment I add is a smidgeon of kelp meal, and that provides all the micoronutrients the plant needs. Most people I know that use this also add 20% peat, but I don't do that. The peat makes the mix a little softer, keeps it wet longer and more uniformly, but I don't think it's necessary. There are formulae that describe the number of air exchanges between the compost and the atmosphere, and those formulae vary according to depth of soil. Peat throws off those exchanges. The reason you want air going in and out freely is that the microbes in the soil need it to carry on their own activities, and it is those activities that your plants need more of. I feed the soil, not the plant. More biological activity equals more nutrition available to the plant. I also like the fact that you water more often without the peat. The roots have to work a little harder to get access to the nurtrients, but that's a good thing, keeping the plant under normal stress. Once you get a line of plants adjusted to this type of soil, they become exceedingly efficient at using it. When you do water, the water flowing down through the roots brings in a whole new breath of oxygen to the deeper parts of the soil. I don't care too much about pH, since plants can make adjustments of their own to deal with that. As long as they have enough of what they're looking for, they can manage well enough on their own. Water! I filter all my water. I use black Berkey filters, and they eliminate all the microbes and nasty stuff you find in tap water, without taking out the beneficial minerals. Room temperature. Soak'em good, then let'em dry out. I don't water until the leaves look a littly limp. I spritz the leaves every day, to simulate dew. Light is the only other ingredient. Most people only use hot lights, but you can grow just fine with cfl's, or, if it's practical, use red and blue LED's. I use LED bulbs that fit into regular sockets, which are a ton cheaper than those gimmicky UFO-types. Getting the right wavelengths and dispersion can be a bit technical, though, so I usually recommend cfl's, for budget, maintenance and safety reasons. You can make cheap reflectors for cfl's out of cardboard and mylar withouth worrying about fire, too. The only other thing I usually have to worry about is bugs. Get other bugs. Fight fire with fire. Duh. In veg, I use only diatomaceous earth and Dr. Bronner's Pure Castille Oil Soap, peppermint flavor (tea tree works just as well, but I like the smell of peppermint). I dowse those babies good, too. No fear of anything when I use those two products, and those two only. Nothing survives, either. The soap I don't use during flower because it makes your herb taste bad. The DE I don't use because it's a mild irritant, and, even though burning plant matter makes a bunch of irritants, I don't want to add to them. Also, as the trichomes grow, the DE will become obvious, and I like to preserve the appearance of my herb, too.

Edited by HerbErb, 23 July 2010 - 09:27 PM.

  • jangel, Bueller, BOBSMOKEBLOW and 3 others like this


                        Please Visit Our Paid Sponsors



#2 GreenMarine9

GreenMarine9

    TREE

  • Seasoned Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 375 posts
  • LocationThe Green Tree

Posted 11 November 2010 - 03:35 PM

I help people that don't know how or that can't do much grow their own. My philosophy is simple: let the plant do its own thing. I've used several methods, and I don't diss any of them. I'm more of an 'agriculture' guy than a 'method' or 'strain' kinda guy. I think about marijuana's place in a garden or on a farm, with all the other plants, animals, insects and diseases you might find there. If you give the plant enough of what it needs and manage the state of the whole affair, I don't see how you can go wrong. That said, if you can't be a farmer, and you really need some herb, here is what I do to maximize yield while
minimizing effort and waste:

Use soil. No moving parts. The soil I use is plain ol' compost. Use organic stuff, with table scraps included. Compost is the stuff dirt is made of. The only amendment I add is a smidgeon of kelp meal, and that provides all the micoronutrients the plant needs. Most people I know that use this also add 20% peat, but I don't do that. The peat makes the mix a little softer, keeps it wet longer and more uniformly, but I don't think it's necessary. There are formulae that describe the number of air exchanges between the compost and the atmosphere, and those formulae vary according to depth of soil. Peat throws off those exchanges. The reason you want air going in and out freely is that the microbes in the soil need it to carry on their own activities, and it is those activities that your plants need more of. I feed the soil, not the plant. More biological activity equals more nutrition available to the plant.

I also like the fact that you water more often without the peat. The roots have to work a little harder to get access to the nurtrients, but that's a good thing, keeping the plant under normal stress. Once you get a line of plants adjusted to this type of soil, they become exceedingly efficient at using it. When you do water, the water flowing down through the roots brings in a whole new breath of oxygen to the deeper parts of the soil. I don't care too much about pH, since plants can make adjustments of their own to deal with that. As long as they
have enough of what they're looking for, they can manage well enough on their own.

Water! I filter all my water. I use black Berkey filters, and they eliminate all the microbes and nasty stuff you find in tap water, without taking out the beneficial minerals. Room temperature. Soak'em good, then let'em dry out. I don't water until the leaves look a littly limp. I spritz the leaves every day, to simulate dew.

Light is the only other ingredient. Most people only use hot lights, but you can grow just fine with cfl's, or, if it's practical, use red and blue LED's. I use LED bulbs that fit into regular sockets, which are a ton cheaper than those gimmicky UFO-types. Getting the right wavelengths and dispersion can be a bit technical, though, so I usually recommend cfl's, for budget, maintenance and safety reasons. You can make cheap reflectors for cfl's out of cardboard and mylar withouth worrying about fire, too.

The only other thing I usually have to worry about is bugs. Get other bugs. Fight fire with fire. Duh. In veg, I use only diatomaceous earth and Dr. Bronner's Pure Castille Oil Soap, peppermint flavor (tea tree works just as well, but I like the smell of peppermint). I dowse those babies good, too. No fear of anything when I use those two products, and those two only. Nothing survives, either. The soap I don't use during flower because it makes your herb taste bad. The DE I don't use because it's a mild irritant, and, even though burning plant matter makes a bunch of irritants, I don't want to add to them. Also, as the trichomes grow, the DE will become obvious, and I like to preserve the appearance of my herb, too.



Hi there,
good information... what kind of yields do you typically get from ea plant?
  • jangel, BOBSMOKEBLOW, teddys head and 1 other like this

#3 envind

envind

    Enthusiast

  • Seasoned Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 153 posts

Posted 11 November 2010 - 04:36 PM

You might want to look into adding some fungal presence back into your soil, but you may already have it, depending on what kind of Compost you are making. Also, if you look into Tea's with your compost, foliar feeding does wonderful things on growth, and the bacteria and fungi of your tea can interfere with pests, notably Powdery Mildew and Spider Mites. A great book covering soil is "Teaming with Microbes".... was reccomended to me by a man that does AMAZING things with a plant, organic and natural. Good thread, Thank you.
  • jangel, BOBSMOKEBLOW, teddys head and 2 others like this

#4 Retired

Retired

    Honored Guest

  • Guests
  • Pip
  • 17 posts

Posted 29 March 2011 - 08:33 AM

Thanks for passing on your info.

#5 coys

coys

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 18 posts

Posted 12 March 2012 - 07:47 PM

great info mate cheers

#6 CRM5096

CRM5096

    Seasoned Member

  • Seasoned Members
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts

Posted 21 December 2012 - 02:10 PM

Man , I finally found this thread again , could not find it in a search Thanks for the KISS




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users