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A few greenhouse pic's


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#26 midgradeindasouth

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 08:09 PM

Posted Image

It looks like the walt disney world of bud.
I would love to be harvesting that.
I would be set for quite some time.


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#27 jangel

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Posted 18 April 2008 - 01:49 PM

Build this greenhouse!

Posted Image

To begin, select a level, well-drained site. Use a glyphosate herbicide to eliminate grass or weeds.
Posted ImagePosted ImageDig holes for 4X4 posts. A trench for plumbing and electrical services connects to an existing building.
These are the 2X6 side rails. The clamps used to hold the PVC ribs in place are screwed into these boards BEFORE the frame is built.

Space the clamps 24 inches apart and leave them loosely connected at this time.
Posted ImagePosted ImageGetting the corners square and the sides level is an important step. Still, this is NOT rocket science, so extreme precision is not necessary.

Note that I added a post in the middle of the side rails. This will increase stability, but it is especially important since I used 16' side rails, instead of the 12' sides specified in the plan.
The rails are attached to the corner posts with large screws and to one another with nails. You can also see two rib braces hanging loosely.

Once the frame is square and level, tamp the corner posts firmly in place.
Posted ImagePosted ImageThe 10' PVC ribs are attached next.

I used Schedule 80 PVC for strength. The pipe has thicker walls than Schedule 40 pipe, so it is stronger, but it also is more expensive.
This hand tool made the job of attaching the ribs go quickly, but a powered screwdriver could be used, just as well.
Posted ImagePosted ImageThe backbone is made of 22-1/2 inch segments of PVC held together with PVC crosses. The crosses add 1-1/2 inch to each section, so the ribs will be 24" apart when they are attached.

On each end of the backbone, a PVC tee is used.

Inside the backbone pipe, a length of electrical conduit is inserted to strengthen the assembly.
This is what the cross looks like at close range. The backbone assembly was completed a day earlier so the glue could fully set.
Posted ImagePosted ImageAttach the backbone to the end and center ribs on one side, then to the matching ribs from the other side.

Getting started is the trickiest part, and it would be helpful to have an assistant.
It is then fairly easy to attach the other ribs, and, voila, a Quonset hut appears!
Posted ImagePosted ImageNext, build the end braces.
These galvanized connectors add strength to the corners.

Also, note the long screw through the PVC rib into the top of the structure.
Posted ImagePosted ImageBoth ends are constructed in the same fashion. One will have a door hung inside it.

The water and electricity are installed at this point, too.
Next, staple weed barrier material to the inside of the rails.

Materials for the floor are not included in the plans from the North Carolina Extension, but some sort of floor is essential. Without it, weeds will sprout inside your greenhouse, and you will get muddy feet when you walk into it.

The floor shown here is probably the least expensive option.
Posted ImagePosted ImagePine bark mulch is spread atop the weed barrier to a depth of about 2 inches. Approximately 30 cubic feet of mulch is required.
Attaching the plastic cover is the final step. Staple it to the rails and to the end frames.

The door is a simple rectangular frame hung with two hinges. Foam tape around the inside of the door frame will improve the temperature management process.
Posted Image The total cost: about $350.

Using Schedule 40 PVC pipe and fittings will reduce the cost by $100 or so. Except for the plastic cover, the structure should last for 10-15 years.


"copied from jcmga.org"


Shaman, this sounds great but no pics left. Amyway you could re-add them so I can see what you are talking aabout? Hate to be a bother but I could use one of those!

Life,
j-angel

#28 GUMP

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 02:08 PM

looks a lot like ours.The big sloped picture. We used clear fiberglass panels. The plastic would not work for us. The greenhouse is outside the fenced in area. Wild critters would tear plastic to pieces, where we live. Plus two legged critters would do the same. The big picture is the way our greenhouse is built. Difference is- West and East windows, with fans in the summer running.One fan pulls in fresh air and the other fans pulls out stale air. Bench goes all the way around, stops at door on West side. From our test run on the greenhouse this winter. The humidity is fierce. On the really sunny warmer days of winter it rains in there. A fan on the floor tipped upward checked this for us. Can't open windows in the winter, to cold. Without the fan there will be mold growing on the plants. Feel kind of bad about what we put those house plants through to find problems. They survived but some barely. Only had a few months to test before winter. But that short time, the little greenhouse really struted her stuff. Never saw anything like the growth and health of the plants put in there. Winter is what we are working on. Lots of kinks to work out, to make this happen. We do not want to lose our first grow of weed through ignorance on our part. One other thing I found. With our set up before winter. The constant moving air and the heat, drys the soil in the plants at a faster rate. Really need to keep an eye on your soil. The soil in the same test plants in the winter, hardly needs much water at all.Once we get the heat problem sorted that may change a bit One watering every week and a half worked fine in winter but summer temps sap that soil. Also because of the high humidity at all times. I put all my potted plants on trays filled with two inches of small river stones. This way good drainage and no root rot. In case of over watering. Mind you, this is how I treated house plants and a few tomato plants. My ideas may not work at all for marijuana. Only know garden stuff. That is why I'm here to learn from you all
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#29 SHAMAN

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 02:35 PM

I also like to grow a few veggies. this is no different from growing the sweet sweet sticky..you will find they are one and the same. Thank for passing on those little tidbits of info on greenhouses, they will come in handy..

#30 SHAMAN

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 02:37 PM

Shaman, this sounds great but no pics left. Amyway you could re-add them so I can see what you are talking aabout? Hate to be a bother but I could use one of those!

Life,
j-angel

I`m looking for the pic`s will have them back asap...:Where Dreams are:
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#31 GUMP

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 02:45 PM

The Afghan Dream seed sound perfect. Place doesn't sell to the U.S. But $90.00 for ten seeds was a shocker. I will have to look for someone that does sell to the U.S. Off to do some searching around.Thanks Shaman.




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