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A few greenhouse pic's


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#1 SHAMAN

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 09:31 PM

GreenHouse's are a great way to prolong the growing season..
If your handy with a hammer and are thinking of a project for the spring, A Greenhouse might be what you need. Its also a great way to camo a few plants in your backyard, Blend them in to the vegatables.


All you really need is a pile of 2x4's screws/nails and a roll of clear plastic.
Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image




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#2 blakeb

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 09:37 PM

and dont forget some time

#3 blakeb

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 09:39 PM

i could definatley build one thats actually real cool to bad i live in an apartment

#4 SHAMAN

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 10:08 PM

*From the OG Growfaq*
Contributed by: Greenhousin'
Thanks to: Burramys Parvus
Submitted: 06-10-2003

A greenhouse is any structure with a covering (usually glass) which is used to control temperature and humidity in the cultivation and protection of plants.

When you have a greenhouse, you effectively have your own little micro-environment that you can control. You become the God of your own little patch of land! Greenhouses donít always have to be made out of glass. Many modern greenhouses are made of plastic, or specialized materials. These materials come in a variety of color, size and thickness. Choosing materials carefully will ensure you have the best greenhouse for your situation.

Greenhouses can be simply DIY jobs using some timber and a drill, or poly tunnels using poly tubing and some polythene sheets. They can also be large custom built structures, using metal and concrete. For most people, a small DIY greenhouse (about 10-20 square meters) will do just fine.

What are some advantages?

Ability to control temperature
The greenhouse design lets light in, and when this light is absorbed by objects inside the greenhouse and turns to heat energy, it is not permitted to escape. The air temperature in the greenhouse will exceed the outside temperature. If it gets too hot, all you have to do is open up some of the ventilation panels (or just open the door, depending on the design) and the temperature will drop. Greenhouses are able to regulate temperatures; temperature fluctuations can stress plants and slow growth.

Ability to control pests
As most greenhouses have a pretty good covering over all the structure, pests can't get in as easily as they could if your plants were just out in the open. This also applies to seeds and even pollen from unwanted plants (such as weeds).

Ability to control humidity
The air-tight covering on a greenhouse causes it to become quite hot and humid inside during the day time. The moisture evaporating from the soil, and the moisture given off by photosynthesizing plants (transpiration) fills the air. Once the air is very humid, it becomes harder for plants to lose water through evaporation, and likewise with the soil. This helps to keep everything from drying out on a hot sunny day. Therefore, it is essential to have air circulation to exhaust excessive humidity and regulate air exchange.

Stealth
Nosey neighbors will have their view obstructed by your greenhouse if you choose to use slightly shaded glass/plastic, which still lets enough light through for strong plant growth, but is opaque enough as to obscure vision from the outside.

Protects your plants from adverse weather conditions
Storms can't blow your plants over and tear them to shreds when they're safely inside your greenhouse! Also helps protect plants in areas where frosts are common.

Excessive fall rain can cause powdery mildew and mold that can effect the final crop.

How does all this environmental control help?

How do higher temps help my plants?
Every plant is made up of cells. Every cell has hundreds of chemical reactions taking place inside it at every moment of the day. These reactions would be very slow, if it wasn't for enzymes. Enzymes act as catalysts for all the chemical reactions taking place in cells (including photosynthesis).

Enzymes work best in certain pH's and temperature ranges, depending on the type of enzyme. Too high or low pH, and the enzymes will work slower than normal, or might even denature (die). Too low a temp, and the enzymes will also not function to capacity, and too high results in them being denatured. Warm -but not hot- temperatures usually result in maximum enzyme efficiency, which means faster plant growth. Having perfect temperatures is like super-charging your plants!

How does higher humidity help my plants?
It helps slow the rate of evaporation from soil and plants, as the air already has a large amount of water suspended in it. Plants use water during photosynthesis (6H20 + 6CO2 (plus sunlight)= C6H12O6) so they need a constant water supply during sunlight hours. Having to battle with high evaporation rates is something they don't want! By lowering this, it enables them to photosynthesis more without losing water to the point of their leaves wilting.

Other advantages
A greenhouse is a great idea for outdoor growers who live in cold climates, or areas where pests and horrible acts of god are a common problem. It also helps hide your crops from anyone who may be having a quick look over their fence. If you want maximum control of your outdoor grow, a greenhouse is an absolute essential part of your garden!

Are there any disadvantages to growing in a greenhouse?
Well, no not really! Growing in a greenhouse is more-or-less just like a regular outdoor grow, except you have much more control over it. The one thing I would say might be a bit disadvantaging would be the humidity. It may increase the risk of mold on your buds. This is easily fixed by opening the greenhouse up a bit and letting some more fresh air in. If you're paranoid about mold attacking your plants in a greenhouse, you can use Potassium Silicate to protect your plants, which is easily available at most gardening/hydroponic shops.


NOTE - Depending on the size, and construction of the greenhouse, you may or may not need permission from local authorities. If they want an inspection, it's probably best to have it cannabis-free for a month or so.

If they want further inspections, it might be a good idea to grow all your 'special' plants in pots, and keep the greenhouse door LOCKED. When someone comes around for an inspection, simply hide the plants somewhere else until the inspection is over. I have never heard of a medium size suburban greenhouse needing to be inspected once, or on a frequent basis. Although, it may be best to check this with local authorities, just to be safe.

#5 the.fatman.cometh

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 11:24 PM

Somebody had mentioned a grow "tent" in a different thread, which is a good concept, but I wondered how that would work. Looks like this could work on a miniature level since I am in an apartment.

#6 Guest_HighPhi_*

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 12:18 AM

looks good, i make them at work occasionally. our neighbours have one just like it with white frost glass, ive always said they are growing weed in there.

#7 SHAMAN

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 12:13 PM

I made a little one for my apartment last year. It was 4f by 4f and 4 foot high..

#8 Guest_HighPhi_*

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 06:13 PM

nice one hows the humidity during winter in there?

#9 SHAMAN

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 06:16 PM

I made a little one for my apartment last year. It was 4f by 4f and 4 foot high..


I used it in the early spring. Worked great, March in Canada is still real cold..

#10 Guest_HighPhi_*

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 06:25 PM

sweet pal, so you have pretty much the whole year of growing then ?

#11 SHAMAN

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 06:49 PM

Not in the dead of winter. Nothing grows exept my belly.. Pack on some winter fat on my ass..

#12 SHAMAN

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 07:22 PM

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#13 MrLizard27

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 01:11 AM

You know it pisses me off. I live in one of he best places to grow outdoors in the world and am too scared to put a few in with the tomaters. Aint scared of the I am scared of the nieghbors ripping me off. 2 outdoor planted in march to bring them in October.

#14 SHAMAN

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 01:21 PM

Build this greenhouse!

Posted Image

To begin, select a level, well-drained site. Use a glyphosate herbicide to eliminate grass or weeds.
Posted ImagePosted ImageDig holes for 4X4 posts. A trench for plumbing and electrical services connects to an existing building.
These are the 2X6 side rails. The clamps used to hold the PVC ribs in place are screwed into these boards BEFORE the frame is built.

Space the clamps 24 inches apart and leave them loosely connected at this time.
Posted ImagePosted ImageGetting the corners square and the sides level is an important step. Still, this is NOT rocket science, so extreme precision is not necessary.

Note that I added a post in the middle of the side rails. This will increase stability, but it is especially important since I used 16' side rails, instead of the 12' sides specified in the plan.
The rails are attached to the corner posts with large screws and to one another with nails. You can also see two rib braces hanging loosely.

Once the frame is square and level, tamp the corner posts firmly in place.
Posted ImagePosted ImageThe 10' PVC ribs are attached next.

I used Schedule 80 PVC for strength. The pipe has thicker walls than Schedule 40 pipe, so it is stronger, but it also is more expensive.
This hand tool made the job of attaching the ribs go quickly, but a powered screwdriver could be used, just as well.
Posted ImagePosted ImageThe backbone is made of 22-1/2 inch segments of PVC held together with PVC crosses. The crosses add 1-1/2 inch to each section, so the ribs will be 24" apart when they are attached.

On each end of the backbone, a PVC tee is used.

Inside the backbone pipe, a length of electrical conduit is inserted to strengthen the assembly.
This is what the cross looks like at close range. The backbone assembly was completed a day earlier so the glue could fully set.
Posted ImagePosted ImageAttach the backbone to the end and center ribs on one side, then to the matching ribs from the other side.

Getting started is the trickiest part, and it would be helpful to have an assistant.
It is then fairly easy to attach the other ribs, and, voila, a Quonset hut appears!
Posted ImagePosted ImageNext, build the end braces.
These galvanized connectors add strength to the corners.

Also, note the long screw through the PVC rib into the top of the structure.
Posted ImagePosted ImageBoth ends are constructed in the same fashion. One will have a door hung inside it.

The water and electricity are installed at this point, too.
Next, staple weed barrier material to the inside of the rails.

Materials for the floor are not included in the plans from the North Carolina Extension, but some sort of floor is essential. Without it, weeds will sprout inside your greenhouse, and you will get muddy feet when you walk into it.

The floor shown here is probably the least expensive option.
Posted ImagePosted ImagePine bark mulch is spread atop the weed barrier to a depth of about 2 inches. Approximately 30 cubic feet of mulch is required.
Attaching the plastic cover is the final step. Staple it to the rails and to the end frames.

The door is a simple rectangular frame hung with two hinges. Foam tape around the inside of the door frame will improve the temperature management process.
Posted Image The total cost: about $350.

Using Schedule 40 PVC pipe and fittings will reduce the cost by $100 or so. Except for the plastic cover, the structure should last for 10-15 years.


"copied from jcmga.org"

#15 ISO2BWELL

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 02:27 PM

Thanks! I think I can build that...looks easy enough. How is the plastic sheeting attached to the baseboard? I would be concerned about it tearing, etc., otherwise the directions are pretty clear. We are looking to relocate, and I am pretty sure that the new home will have at least 1 greenhouse...likely 2, in the backyard. ISO

#16 SHAMAN

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 02:59 PM

staples threw strips of cardboard or thick plastic strips to keep the staples from ripping threw the plastic sheet. Does that make sence?? I know what I mean but putting it in to words right now is tough.. :toast:

#17 SHAMAN

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 03:01 PM

Posted Image
See the little white tabs. Those keep the staples from ripping threw the plastic..

#18 ISO2BWELL

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 03:11 PM

See the little white tabs. Those keep the staples from ripping threw the plastic..


Gotchya! I can easily add a "strength strip" along the boottom of the plastic...why didn't I think if that? :toast:


Wife wants a greenhouse...bad! There is really no place to put it here, and I don't want to build/tear-down and rebuild at the new home (wherever it will be).

ISO

#19 SHAMAN

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 11:35 PM

And finally this is what the in side of the greenhouse should look when harvest comes..
Posted Image

#20 green_nobody

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 08:04 AM

nice setup shaman, but that last pic is a bit more then i can handle or need:wink: never the less i have to try this construction:)

#21 ISO2BWELL

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 01:28 PM

And finally this is what the in side of the greenhouse should look when harvest comes..
Posted Image




How did you ever get a pic of Heaven???????????????

ISO

#22 blakeb

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 02:44 PM

omg omg the plants look like they go on forever!!! lmao heaven is right

#23 HeadPawthead

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 04:58 PM

Damn, thats sweet

And finally this is what the in side of the greenhouse should look when harvest comes..
Posted Image



#24 Hobo

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 12:09 AM

are there any zoning issues in most states, where there would be a discrepancy about putting a structure up like that in your yard. of course the pot growing in it isnt exactly legal either heheh (depending who you are and where you live of course). but i know those portable garage- ike tent things have caused some of my friends zoning problems in the past.

#25 midgradeindasouth

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Posted 05 December 2007 - 08:07 PM

I need about 40 acres and some sort of klingon cloak device? Then I would try it. It is just to risky down here in the south.




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