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Milk as a Fungicide


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#1 justanotherbozo

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Posted 17 August 2009 - 08:50 AM

here is another all natural treatment for pests, powdery mildew in this case.

(although you may have seen this already, it is worth posting again)


Milk is a useful fungicide in the garden, and is more effective than standard chemical brands.


Researchers believe the potassium phosphate in milk boosts a plant's immune system to fight the fungi.

Where most organic gardeners use a baking soda, soap and oil solution, milk may be substituted to combat the unwanted fungus.

Preparing a Milk Solution and Spraying Schedule

The correct dilution and spraying schedule for garden plants depends on the situation and takes some trial and error.

A milk fungicide solution can range from 1 part milk to 9 parts water, to a strong, milk-only solution. A 1:1 dilution may work for a week, but a 1:8 solution requires spraying every 3 or 4 days.

Skim milk may work better than whole milk, as the higher fat milk may clog a sprayer; even reconstituted powdered milk works.

Uses for Milk Fungicide

Milk was originally used in the garden to treat powdery mildew on squash plants. It is now also commonly used on flowers such as rudebekia (Black-eyed Susans) and Begonias to cure powdery mildew.

Milk has also been used to cure Botrytis on a Cyclamen houseplant. This was applied full strength every morning (leftover breakfast milk). Rotten leaves were picked away and the plant pulled through with no more Botrytis.

Black spots and rust on roses can be controlled but not cured with milk. Fortunately, milk can prevent the spread of these fungi to other plants and new leaves. This can be very useful when bringing home a plant from the nursery and finding a black spot.


The copyright of the article Milk as a Garden Fungicide for Powdery Mildew, Botrytis, and Black Spots in Organic Gardening is owned by Deborah Turton. Permission to republish Milk as a Garden Fungicide for Powdery Mildew, Botrytis, and Black Spots in print or online must be granted by the author in writing.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


by Arzeena Hamir
Powdery Mildew

Less than 3 years ago, researchers in South America discovered a new alternative to controlling powdery mildew. Wagner Bettiol, a scientist from Brazil, found that weekly sprays of milk controlled powdery mildew in zucchini just as effectively as synthetic fungicides such as fenarimol or benomyl. Not only was milk found to be effective at controlling the disease, it also acted as a foliar fertilizer, boosting the plant's immune system.

Powdery mildew in the cucurbit family is caused by the organism Sphaerotheca Fuliginea. It is a serious disease that occurs worldwide. For decades, organic gardeners had to rely on making a spray from baking soda to control the disease. Now, instead of measuring out the baking soda and combining it with a surfactant (a "sticking" substance) of either oil or soap, gardeners need only head for their refrigerators.

In his experiments with zucchini plants, Bettiol found that a weekly spray of milk at a concentration of at least 10% (1 part milk to 9 parts water) significantly reduced the severity of powdery mildew infection on the plants by 90%. While some gardeners may be tempted to increase the concentration of milk for more control, Bettiol found that once concentrations rose above 30%, an innoccuous fungus began to grow on the plants. How does milk control powdery mildew?

Scientist aren't 100% sure how milk works to control this disease. It seems that milk is a natural germicide. In addition, it contains several naturally occurring salts and amino acids that are taken up by the plant. From previous experiments using sodium bicarbonate, potassium phosphate, and other salts, researchers have found that the disease is sensitive to these salts. It is possible then, that milk boosts the plant's immune system to prevent the disease.

Milk used around the world
The benefits of using milk to control powdery mildew haven't been isolated to Brazil. Melon growers in New Zealand are saving thousands of dollars every year by spraying their crops with milk instead of synthetic fungicides. The melon growers in New Zealand have been so successful that the wine industry is taking notice and beginning experiments using milk to control powdery mildew in grapes.

What kind of milk should be used?
In Bettiol's original experiment, fresh milk was used, straight from the cow. However, this is obviously not feasible to most home gardeners. The research work in New Zealand actually found that using skim milk was just as effective. Not only was it cheaper, but the fact that the milk had no fat content meant that there was less chance of any odours.

Wagner Bettiol's original article was published in the journal Crop Science (Vol. 18, 1999, pp. 489-92).

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#2 mediuse

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 03:25 AM

Think I'm going to add Milk-Fungicide-Spray to my Panic List.




Hehehe





muA

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#3 KnuckleDragger

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 01:26 PM

Learn something new everyday. laserGP.gif
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#4 Captain Kush

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Posted 26 July 2010 - 12:21 PM

I have tried this many times using whole milk, skim, 1%, 2% and had no luck. The only luck I had using milk is using unpasteurized, fresh whole milk. It wasnt hard to find, I just went to my local farmers market and tada! Fresh milk available by the qt or gallon. Namaste
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#5 KaeaneabisSativas

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 01:48 PM

here is another all natural treatment for pests, powdery mildew in this case.

(although you may have seen this already, it is worth posting again)


Milk is a useful fungicide in the garden, and is more effective than standard chemical brands.


Researchers believe the potassium phosphate in milk boosts a plant's immune system to fight the fungi.

Where most organic gardeners use a baking soda, soap and oil solution, milk may be substituted to combat the unwanted fungus.

Preparing a Milk Solution and Spraying Schedule

The correct dilution and spraying schedule for garden plants depends on the situation and takes some trial and error.

A milk fungicide solution can range from 1 part milk to 9 parts water, to a strong, milk-only solution. A 1:1 dilution may work for a week, but a 1:8 solution requires spraying every 3 or 4 days.

Skim milk may work better than whole milk, as the higher fat milk may clog a sprayer; even reconstituted powdered milk works.

Uses for Milk Fungicide

Milk was originally used in the garden to treat powdery mildew on squash plants. It is now also commonly used on flowers such as rudebekia (Black-eyed Susans) and Begonias to cure powdery mildew.

Milk has also been used to cure Botrytis on a Cyclamen houseplant. This was applied full strength every morning (leftover breakfast milk). Rotten leaves were picked away and the plant pulled through with no more Botrytis.

Black spots and rust on roses can be controlled but not cured with milk. Fortunately, milk can prevent the spread of these fungi to other plants and new leaves. This can be very useful when bringing home a plant from the nursery and finding a black spot.


The copyright of the article Milk as a Garden Fungicide for Powdery Mildew, Botrytis, and Black Spots in Organic Gardening is owned by Deborah Turton. Permission to republish Milk as a Garden Fungicide for Powdery Mildew, Botrytis, and Black Spots in print or online must be granted by the author in writing.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------


by Arzeena Hamir
Powdery Mildew

Less than 3 years ago, researchers in South America discovered a new alternative to controlling powdery mildew. Wagner Bettiol, a scientist from Brazil, found that weekly sprays of milk controlled powdery mildew in zucchini just as effectively as synthetic fungicides such as fenarimol or benomyl. Not only was milk found to be effective at controlling the disease, it also acted as a foliar fertilizer, boosting the plant's immune system.

Powdery mildew in the cucurbit family is caused by the organism Sphaerotheca Fuliginea. It is a serious disease that occurs worldwide. For decades, organic gardeners had to rely on making a spray from baking soda to control the disease. Now, instead of measuring out the baking soda and combining it with a surfactant (a "sticking" substance) of either oil or soap, gardeners need only head for their refrigerators.

In his experiments with zucchini plants, Bettiol found that a weekly spray of milk at a concentration of at least 10% (1 part milk to 9 parts water) significantly reduced the severity of powdery mildew infection on the plants by 90%. While some gardeners may be tempted to increase the concentration of milk for more control, Bettiol found that once concentrations rose above 30%, an innoccuous fungus began to grow on the plants. How does milk control powdery mildew?

Scientist aren't 100% sure how milk works to control this disease. It seems that milk is a natural germicide. In addition, it contains several naturally occurring salts and amino acids that are taken up by the plant. From previous experiments using sodium bicarbonate, potassium phosphate, and other salts, researchers have found that the disease is sensitive to these salts. It is possible then, that milk boosts the plant's immune system to prevent the disease.

Milk used around the world
The benefits of using milk to control powdery mildew haven't been isolated to Brazil. Melon growers in New Zealand are saving thousands of dollars every year by spraying their crops with milk instead of synthetic fungicides. The melon growers in New Zealand have been so successful that the wine industry is taking notice and beginning experiments using milk to control powdery mildew in grapes.

What kind of milk should be used?
In Bettiol's original experiment, fresh milk was used, straight from the cow. However, this is obviously not feasible to most home gardeners. The research work in New Zealand actually found that using skim milk was just as effective. Not only was it cheaper, but the fact that the milk had no fat content meant that there was less chance of any odours.

Wagner Bettiol's original article was published in the journal Crop Science (Vol. 18, 1999, pp. 489-92).


I have always used my leftover, empty milk jugs as a gentle fast acting nitrogen additive, but never knew this...
AWESOME POST!!!
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#6 TOXICMMJ

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 02:53 PM

I used this on my pumpkin plant and it worked like a champ. I have been trying to grow them for 3 years and have lost them every year to powdery mildew. This worked and I ended up with 4 pumpkins on one plant. made the kids happy as can be.
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#7 flyinglow

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Posted 23 November 2015 - 06:31 PM

This sounds legit to me, however I've never tried this.

What I do know is a friend of mine is a large "caregiver", he operates

a 10000 sq ft medical grow op and he swears his secret weapon to getting

his big beautiful buds is feeding his plants unpasteurized, fresh whole milk from the farm.


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